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How do you respond to Jeremiah 1:5

The Lord says to Jeremiah, “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I consecrated you; I appointed you a prophet to the nations.”

This verse shows God’s love and plan for Jeremiah before he was born. This does not imply that Jeremiah could not have “rejected God’s purpose for [himself],” just as the Pharisees did in Jesus’ day (Luke 7:30). The Bible contains many examples of people whom God appointed for a purpose but who freely thwarted God’s plan for their life. Indeed, every person who damns himself or herself does so by thwarting God’s loving will for his or her life, for God’s will is for “all to come to repentance” and be saved (2 Pet. 3:9).

We thus have reason to believe that Jeremiah was free to accept or reject the divine appointment announced in this verse. We know about God’s prenatal intentions for his life only because he, unlike many others, did obey the calling of God.

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