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What is the significance of Isaiah 38:1–5?

God tells Hezekiah “you shall die: you shall not recover” (vs. 1). Hezekiah pleads with God and God decides to “add fifteen years” to his life.

As we noted concerning 2 Kings 20:1–5, if God foreknew that he wasn’t going to end Hezekiah’s life, his declaration that he intended to do so and his decision to “add” years to Hezekiah’s life seems disingenuous. According to the classical view, however, the length of Hezekiah’s life was foreknown by God all along.

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