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A Calvinist and an Arminian walk into a bar…

This joke is still very funny

Toby Bradbury via Compfight

Roger Olson posted A Conversation between a Calvinist and an Arminian about God’s Sovereignty that we thought was dead on. In fact, we kind of wonder if Roger is bugging some of the conversations we’ve had. Déjà vu much? And since Roger has argued that Open Theism should be included under the broader umbrella of Arminianism, you can just substitute “Open Theist” where you see “Arminian” and it won’t make a bit of difference.

Here’s a snippet of the conversation from Roger’s post:

Arminian: “How does God love those he predestined, foreordained, to hell?”

Calvinist: “He gives them many temporal blessings.”

Arminian: “You mean he gives them a little bit of heaven to go to hell in.”

Calvinist: “Well, I wouldn’t put it that way.”

Arminian: “That’s what it sounds like to me.”

Calvinist: “That’s because you don’t understand God correctly. God is infinite and beyond our comprehension. So God’s love is not the same as our love. It transcends it.”

Arminian: “How is that different from saying God is ‘supercalifragilisticexpialadocious’?”

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