ISIS, Islam & Jesus

ISIS, Islam & Jesus

Our friend Bruxy taught a series at The Meeting House titled ISIS, Islam & Jesus that we wanted to share with you. This is episode one, and you can find the whole series by clicking here. If you believe in redemptive violence, you’ll be challenged by what he has to say.

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Does Following Jesus Rule Out Serving in the Military if a War is Just?

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Following Jesus from the Margins

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Is Having the “Right” Theology the Core of Christianity?

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The Myth of Redemptive Violence

Check out Shane Claiborne’s excellent piece on the problem of violence posted yesterday on Huffington Post. Money quote: “Christian theologians have said Jesus teaches a ‘third way’ to interact with evil. We see a Jesus who abhors both passivity and violence and teaches us a new way forward that is neither submission nor assault, neither…

Podcast: Is There a Moral Difference Between Killing and Murder?

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What did Jesus mean when he said he came not to bring peace, but a sword (Mt 10:34)?

Given Jesus’ uniform teaching about loving enemies and abstaining from violence, and given that his followers were known for their refusal to engage in violence for the first three hundred years of church history, it’s obvious that Jesus wasn’t saying he came so that his disciples would use swords. The context of Jesus’ comment makes…