Anabaptist Response to the Attacks in Paris and Beirut

Anabaptist Response to the Attacks in Paris and Beirut

Our friend Bruxy Cavey, the pastor at The Meeting House in Toronto shares some thoughts on how to respond to the violence that is going on in the world. He writes:

The Meeting House is a Historic Peace Church. In responding to terrorism, we don’t presume to tell governments what they should do, for they bear the sword (Romans 13). However Jesus and the early Church leaders were clear – the Church should not bear the sword, in action or in attitude (Matt 5; Luke 6; Romans 12; etc). We fight a different kind of war.

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