One Hope

One Hope

When Jesus was crucified by his enemies instead of conquering his enemies, the hope of Jesus’ disciples came crashing down in utter despair. They had hoped that Jesus would establish the kingdom of God in the same way that other kingdoms were established. However, the resurrection reveals that the kingdom of God is not like any other kingdom, nation, or government. That alternative kingdom is our one hope.

You can view the full sermon here.

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