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Podcast: If God Has ‘Infinite Intelligence,’ Wouldn’t He Also Necessarily Have Exhaustive Foreknowledge

Greg discusses the relationship between God’s intelligence and his foreknowledge. 

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Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
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Greg’s new book: Inspired Imperfection
Dan’s new book: Confident Humility


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