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On Biblical Inerrancy

Epistles of the Apostles
Matthew Kirkland via Compfight

In this essay, Peter Enns explains his views on Biblical inerrancy and the complexities encountered as evangelicals attempt to define the term.

From the essay:

Speaking as a biblical scholar, inerrancy is a high-maintenance doctrine. It takes much energy to “hold on to” and produces much cognitive dissonance. I am hardly alone. Over the last twenty years or so, I have crossed paths with more than a few biblical scholars with evangelical roots, even teaching in inerrantist schools, who nervously tread delicate paths re-defining, nuancing, and adjusting their definition of inerrancy to accommodate the complicating factors that greet us at every turn in the historical study of Scripture.

(Disclaimer: We link to various articles and blog posts not necessarily because we are in 100% agreement with them, but because we think they offer a perspective worth thinking about)

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