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Hearing and Responding to God: Part 1

Hearing and Responding to God: Part 1

A reader contacted Greg asking about making “right decisions” assuming an open future and in light of the fact that God seems to rarely speak clearly. In this first response, Greg acknowledges that even with the best of intentions, our decisions can have outcomes that are unexpected even to God! How can we move forward with confidence? We get questions like this a lot, and we hope this series will be a blessing to all of you.

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