In Search of Healing During Advent

The First Sunday of Advent

Tyler Tully was a guest-poster on The Femonite today. He generally blogs at The Jesus Event and is a contributor to the Mennonerds network. His guest post deals with the flashbacks of a childhood filled with abuse that are triggered when he hears the cries of his five month old babies. The season of Advent is a season of waiting and darkness in the church calendar, and although it brings with it the coming of Christ, it is a season that welcomes our sorrow and pain. It calls us to keep each other company in the darkness as we wait. If you’re a person who struggles as Christmas approaches, we hope this post will call you to be present to the God who grieves with us and heals our wounds.

From Tyler’s piece:

Still, there is an expected healing of hope in the Seasonal air. The Incarnation reminds me, that although I enter into counseling one month before Christmas Eve, I do not bear this burden alone. Together we journey with Jesus in a place of vulnerability towards community. As a family, we either heal together or we enable the stinging pain of abuse to linger. But even when healing occurs, sometimes scars remain. And although I know that the scars I bear come part and parcel with being human, I worship the Incarnate God who resurrected triumphantly with scars of His own.

Image by  Susanne Nilsson via Compfight

Related Reading

Some Questions a Year After Her Child’s Death

Jessica Kelley wrote a post for The Jesus Event that we wanted to share with you. You might remember that last year we were getting to know Jessica as she lost her four year old son Henry just before Christmas. In this post, she reflects on the theology of the people around her concerning her son’s death. She has…

Does God Still Heal?

In the ancient world Jesus was known first and foremost as an exorcist and a healer. These two activities are mentioned in every summary of Jesus’s ministry found in the Gospels. It’s common for Western Christians today to accept that infirmities (sickness, disease, injuries, disabilities and deformities) are part of God’s mysterious plan for their…

Did Jesus Have Two Minds?

As I laid out in the previous post, I believe Jesus is fully God and fully human. The question is: How is this possible? How do we talk about the way that Jesus was fully God and fully man? The Creed of Chalcedon (451) tries to answer the question this way: We, then, following the…

Topics:

Lighten Up: Osheta the Narniac

You may not be aware of this, but Greg is a MennoNerd. What is a MennoNerd, you ask? According to their website, “MennoNerds is a network of Anabaptist bloggers, tweeps, Facebookers, and Google plussians (just made that word up) from around the Internet.” They recently started a series of fun video blog conversations and they’ve been…

Jesus Said, “Buy a sword.” What did he mean?

Yesterday, I challenged the common assumption that Jesus was violent when he drove out the animals and turned over tables in the Temple courts. (See post.) Today I want to look at the second episode some site to suggest Jesus wasn’t totally opposed to violence. It takes place just before Jesus and his disciples leave…

How NOT To Be Christ-Centered: A Review of God With Us – Part I

Theologians throughout Church history have used the concept of divine accommodation to account for everything in Scripture that seemed “unworthy” of God. Whatever didn’t line up with what we know about God was seen as God accommodating his revelation to our limited and fallen framework. The trouble is, theologians have, by and large, used the…