We’re in This Together: Unity and Disunity

Old Couple

 Hartwig HKD via Compfight

Christena Cleveland has been doing a series called Beyond Multiethnic on her blog for the last several weeks. It’s superb. In her introductory post, she states:

I’m excited about the booming interest in multiethnic/multiracial church, I really am. But racial/ethnic divisions are really just the tip of the iceberg; they’re often the most glaring divisions and the most difficult to justify.  But below the surface there are plenty of other divisions, that left uncrossed, tend to marginalize people, label them as outcasts and exclude them from a seat at the table of the family of God. We often strenuously cite theological support for these divisions. But regardless of what we believe the Bible says about certain behaviors, roles, identities or belief systems, we never have permission to dishonor the image of God in people. Never.

It’s easy to miss the small and big ways that various groups are marginalized in our churches, but the truth is that the call for unity and reconciliation goes way beyond the categories we generally think about. How do we welcome the marginalized in our midst? It’s a question that every church should be asking.

If you’d like to catch up on the series, you can find the posts below. So far she has covered the ways in which we can welcome the poor, undocumented immigrants and single adults. Check them all out and stay tuned for future posts!

Part I

Part II

Part III

Part IV

Christena is the author of Disunity in Christ: Uncovering the Hidden Forces that Keep Us ApartIf this series strikes a chord with you, you really should check out this book.

Related Reading

Lighten Up: Ball and Chain Theology

Let’s not allow our theology to keep us from encountering one another in meaningful ways.

12 Reasons for Keeping the Kingdom of God Separate from Politics, Part 1

Image by the justified sinner via Flickr Jesus came to establish a kingdom that was not of this world. This is why Jesus refused to call on angels to defend himself and why he forbid his followers to use violence to defend themselves or advance their cause. It’s also why neither Jesus nor Paul nor…

Responding in Love

The world is full of conflict where evil begets more evil. Violence produces more violence. Arguments produce more arguments. It’s a tit-for-tat world. What is God’s strategy for stopping this conflict? How does God respond to evil, and how does God call us to respond? This strategy might even come in handy during heated conversations…

How should Christians respond to Near Death Experiences?

In a recent Q and A session about the book of Revelation, Greg Boyd and Paul Eddy answer a question on How Christians should respond to claims of Near Death Experiences. You can view the entire Q and A HERE.

Happy New Year from ReKnew

Bless you all as we embark on a brand new year. We’re praying that the Kingdom of God penetrates the darkness of our world with light and peace and love that reflects his goodness. Photo credit: Marcia Erickson

The Call to Suffer

Paul tells us that in all our relations, we are to “have the same attitude of mind Christ Jesus had” (Phil 2:5). Though he was “in very nature God,” he didn’t cling to this status. Rather, for our sake he set aside his divine prerogatives, took on the nature of a servant and “humbled himself…