On Renunciation

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Jonathan Kos-Read via Compfight

We are bombarded daily with messages that urge us to satisfy every desire we might have. That’s what consumers do. And that’s exactly what the world has reduced us to: consumers. But what about Jesus’ words in Luke 9:23:

Then Jesus said to them all: “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me.”

Richard Beck posted a piece today on renunciation, something we hear less and less about. Renunciation asks us to be the very opposite of consumers. It demands that we lay down our rights and our desires for the sake of our love for God and our love for others. Here’s a thought-provoking excerpt from Richard’s post. We hope you’ll take the time to read the whole piece.

You aren’t denying yourself in order to earn your way into heaven. Self-denial isn’t about collecting spiritual merit badges. Nor are you denying yourself because God is a Puritanical Judge waiting to zap you with lighting bolts if you eat chocolate, dance or have an orgasm.

No, the reason you deny yourself is so that you can make yourself increasingly available to others.

Love requires self-mastery. Love requires a denial of the self.

Love requires discipline. 

Love is discipline.

Love involves the renunciation of sin in our lives. A renunciation of wickedness and the Devil.

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