Podcast: Do Open Theists Believe that God EVER Intercedes Directly in the World?

Greg considers God’s intervention in light of human prayer, and discusses the covenant of non-coercion.

[3] Swain, 40.

Photo via Ted Van Peltflickr.com
GodIntervenes

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Greg’s new book: Inspired Imperfection
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