Podcast: What About Guns?

Greg shoots straight in this controversial episode on guns. He also tells the tale of the time he shot the German Luger. Also, Dan corrupts the youth (as per typical).

Image from www.quotecatalog.com

Guns

Send Questions To:

Dan: @thatdankent
Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
Twitter: @reKnewOrg


Greg’s new book: Inspired Imperfection
Dan’s new book: Confident Humility


Subscribe:

    Stitcher        

Related Reading

The Kingdom Stance Toward Enemies

Jesus was praying in the garden of Gethsemane, when a group of temple guards showed up to arrest him. Peter immediately drew his sword and started swinging it, cutting off a guard’s ear. From the world’s point of view, this violence was justified. Peter was simply defending himself and his master. Yet Jesus rebuked him,…

Are You Guilty of Marcionism?

Greg responds to the question of whether or not his cruciform hermeneutic is anything like the heresy of Marcion, who basically advocated throwing out the Old Testament. (Spoiler: it’s not.)

The Rorschach Test

The choices we make will either increase or decrease our ability to recognize light when we see it.  As we choose goodness, we increase our capacity for goodness. What do you see when you read the Bible or look at God or interact with others? Everything is a Rorschach test to some extent, revealing the light…

Should Christians really only use non-violent resistance to things like war/genocide?

Question: Greg Boyd describes himself as a pacifist. I am curious to know what he thinks about wars or any other situation where genocide is happening. When such evil things are being done by force and violence, how should Christians, and other moral, loving people for that matter, respond? Are we really to use only non-violent…

ISIS, Islam & Jesus

Our friend Bruxy taught a series at The Meeting House titled ISIS, Islam & Jesus that we wanted to share with you. This is episode one, and you can find the whole series by clicking here. If you believe in redemptive violence, you’ll be challenged by what he has to say.

How Are We To Love the Soldiers of ISIS?

Over the last several weeks I’ve received some form of this question almost every day. In some cases the question is asked rhetorically, as though the very question exposes the absurdity of suggesting we are to love this terroristic group. Other times the question is asked with a pragmatic twist. One person recently said to…