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What is the significance of Exodus 16:4?

The Lord commands the Israelites to gather only enough bread for one day while in the wilderness. “In that way,” the Lord says, “I will test them, whether they will follow my instruction or not.”

Testing people to find out how they will resolve their character only makes sense if God is not certain of their character ahead of time.

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