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Insights from a Technology Fast

Hannah Brencher took a two week technology fast and shared what she learned last week. Of course, if you’re reading this, you obviously make use of technology and we’re not saying that there’s anything wrong with that. (We use it an awful lot too.) But there’s a proper place for technology and it’s good to periodically set it aside and notice the urges and voices that pop up when you cut off your reliance on it. Notice where you’re getting LIFE, and devote yourself to coming back to your source over and over again. Notice when anything, including technology, bleeds into the places that God alone should occupy in your heart and mind.

From her article:

My body- unrest. My thoughts- ungodly. My spirit- unfed. Me- in a steady, steady habit of checking my email before bed. 3am. 6am. My day sculpted already by the responses I must give to people, the photo albums I’ve devoured, the outfits I’ve seen pinned and the people I must call. Found & digested, all before God could even lift up His mighty hands and say, “Child, when shall I gear you for the work ahead? When will you realize the world will never feed you?”

It’s idolatry and I’ve never known it. To make myself a demigod. A person worth following. And if my streams, my Instagrammed actions, my blog holds no trace of the God who rains in my soul then who am I? Who am I & what kind of example have I been for you?

Image by Thomas Leuthard. Used in accordance with Creative Commons. Sourced via Flickr

 

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