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Old and New

Old & New – Round 3 Trailer by Fred Sprinkle.

Our good friend Jim LePage is a graphic artist with amazing talent. Some of you are familiar with him via his work for Woodland Hills or through his amazing Word designs in which he came up with a graphic piece for each book of the Bible. Now Jim is involved in the Old & New project. You can read about it below. We encourage you to check it out and maybe even purchase some of the artwork. It’s outstanding work and the proceeds all go to the Blood:Water Mission which addresses the AIDS/HIV and water crises in Africa. The third round launches today!

Old & New Project Releases Round 3: Turning Points

Old & New Project returns this month with another round of religious contemporary graphic art. This time, contributors span both the globe and the current spectrum of design celebrity—with artists both well-known and up-and-coming invited to participate.

Earlier this year the creators opened a public call for portfolio submissions and several artists from round 3 are from that public call.

According to the site’s creators, the new round of designs is focused on “Turning Points” in various biblical stories, “single moments in each character’s narrative that changed the trajectory of their own lives, or even human history.”

A new design will be posted Monday-Friday beginning April 22 and will feature work from the following artists:

Adam Anderson, Alexandra Beguez, Allie Smith, Anna Hurley, Brian Doc Reed, Chank Diesel, Chris Rushing, Ciara Panacchia, Dominic Flask, Emily Dove, Joe Cavazos, Julie Frey, Matt Stevens, Melanie Matthews, Mikey Burton, Rogie King, Shed Labs, Sophia Foster-Dimino, Tommy Chandra, Travis Brown

About Old & New Project

Old & New provides a platform for contemporary graphic artists to exhibit works themed on Biblical stories and passages. It also aims to introduce a new online audience to Biblical art, attempting to replace popular, yet sometimes low-quality, contemporary Biblical artwork with the kind of accessible and honorable work that has historically been associated with the Bible.

The website is a curated collection of single designs by a variety of international illustrators, artists and designers. The collections are released in an indefinite series of rounds. The goal of these rounds will be to bring new light to well known Biblical passages as well as introducing less familiar (or comfortable) content.

There are a few things that make this project unique.

  1. Inclusion: Old & New is not an attempt to convert folks or create religious propaganda. In order to take a new look at this old book, we want, in fact we need, artists from all types of faith perspectives. That may include different religious backgrounds, those who have had a really negative experience with the church, agnostics and atheists.

  2. Accessibility: If you want to learn more about the Bible, there are a lot of complex theological books written for that reason. With Old & New, our goal is that both the art and writing are accessible to all types of people, regardless of how much they may or may not know about theology.

  3. Reaching Out: We’re honored to partner with Blood Water Mission, an organization that focuses on empowering communities to work together against the HIV/AIDS and water crises in Africa. Prints of designs are available to purchase and proceeds go to Blood:Water Mission (over $1000 during the first 2 rounds).

     

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