Something Further on Ferguson: I Raise My Hands

raisemyhands1

Osheta Moore is a friend of ReKnew with a unique Kingdom vision. She is a voice you will want to be listening to. She wrote this sensitive and prophetic piece on her personal response to the death of Michael Brown and the subsequent events in Ferguson called I Raise My Hands: A Prayerful Response to Ferguson. This is a must-read. Let’s all stand in prayerful solidarity, hands raised in surrender and protest to the God who grieves with us and brings hope today.

From Osheta’s post: (but we beg you to click on the link above and read the entire article.)

Today, I raise my hands. These holy hands made holy to do the holy work of reconcillation in this sin-stained world.   I raise my hands and ask God to redeem the violence, redeem the suffering, redeem the heartbreak in Ferguson.  I raise my hands to thank him that he has overcome but to ask him to come, be present, and bring peace. With my hands in the air I pray, “By your wounds we are healed, Lord.  Usher in healing for grieving families and the community of Ferguson.”

Today, I raise my hands, because perfect love casts out all fear and because Abba Father sees the suffering of his children.  I raise my hands to bear witness to my  brothers and sisters who were tear gassed and shot with rubber bullets. I raise my hands because my love for them is restless. I can’t do anything tangible with these hands, but raise them high.  Lord, we are restless for change and anxious for hope.  We are witnesses of injustice. We are the women at the foot of the cross, empower us to stay through the torment so that we can be present to bind up wounds and then—see resurrection.

Related Reading

Ferguson, Racism, & the Kingdom

In light of the issues that have arisen in Ferguson, Mo this last week (for more on this click here), we thought we would offer some reflections on this topic from Greg that he wrote several years ago. A version of this piece eventually ended up in Greg’s book Myth of a Christian Religion. ___________________________________ Many…

Podcast: How Much Hope Should We Have that We Can Find Unity Amid So Much Diversity?

Greg looks at Galatians 3:26-29.  http://traffic.libsyn.com/askgregboyd/Episode_0370.mp3

Kingdom Reconciliation is Not About Politics (But it is Political)

In the broader culture, the social and political discussions about racial reconciliation are usually focused on people’s rights and privileges as a means of making the world a fairer place. The criteria such efforts at reconciliation appeal to are common decency, fairness and reason. The enterprise is certainly necessary, and all decent, fair minded, rational…

Quotes to Chew on: Racial Reconciliation

Jesus perfectly embodied God’s heart for racial reconciliation. For example, most Jews of Jesus’ day despised Samaritans as racially impure and as heretics. They avoided physical or social contact with them if at all possible. Yet Jesus went out of his way to have contact with them, even touching some who were lepers. Moreover, he…

The Church & Racism in America

Elias Schewel via Compfight Over the weekend, tapes were released that revealed some shocking racists statements attributed to the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers. President Obama has commented. Sports analysts have opined. Coaches and players in the NBA are understandably disgusted and overwhelmed by it all. What should the church say at a time like this?…

Confessions of a Christian Nation (Racism)

In honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Greg Boyd, Brian McLaren and Brian Zahnd apologize to the African American community for the church’s complicity in the oppression of African Americans throughout American history. Video by Rex Harsin