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questions

What Does Greg Think About _________________?

Since the launch of the new website yesterday, I’ve been browsing around the various topics to see what I can find. You can click here to join me. This is awesome. If you want to know what Greg has to say about the nature of the future and God’s knowledge of it, you can find it very quickly. And there are even subcategories if you want to go deeper. For instance, you could click here to explore what Open Theism is and is not.

If you have a friend who does not believe in God because of the violent depictions of God in the Old Testament, then you could send them a link to this.

Maybe you’re are preaching a sermon or leading a Bible study on the Trinity and you want to read what Greg has said about that complex topic. Then go here.

Of course, there is more content available than you can digest in one sitting. Who can plummet the beauty of God? Today I found a post as I was browsing and I read a paragraph that set the course for my day. Greg wrote.

Humans were created out of God’s perfect love—in his “image” and “likeness”—for the purpose of participating in and expressing God’s perfect love (Gen 1:26-27). We were created to dance with and in the triune God. We were created for a relationship with God and each other that is nothing less than a participation in, and reflection of, the triune relationship that God eternally is. This is how we “participate in the divine nature” (2 Peter 1:4).

As you browse the topics on this new website, may the love and beauty of God grow in you.

Scott Boren for ReKnew

Photo credit: h.koppdelaney via VisualHunt / CC BY-ND

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