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Podcast: How Can We Objectively Know What is Literal in the Bible and What is Not?

Greg discusses bible interpretation, and all that that implies. Greg goes toe-to-toe with fundamentalist bible interpreters.

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Send Questions To:

Dan: @thatdankent
Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
Twitter: @reKnewOrg


Greg’s new book: Inspired Imperfection
Dan’s new book: Confident Humility


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