Podcast: How Do You Make Sense of the Killing of Ananias and Sapphira?

Greg considers: “Who actually killed Ananias and Sapphira.” This ancient murder mystery has enormous theological implications! Listen as Inspector Boyd hunts for clues and builds a most compelling case.

Photo credit: jean louis mazieres via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Ananias

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Greg’s new book: Inspired Imperfection
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