Podcast: How Do You Make Sense of the Wrath of God in John 3:36?

Learn and Turn. Greg discusses why the wrath of God is probably not an emotion of God but a way of describing the consequences built in to sin.

wrath

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Greg’s new book: Inspired Imperfection
Dan’s new book: Confident Humility


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