The Nature of Temptation

The Nature of Temptation

How does temptation work? Based on James 1:13-16, Greg unpacks the way that desire can give birth to sin. But desire is actually rooted in our longing for God, and the desire itself—and therefore the temptation itself—is not in and of itself a sin. God created us with a “hungry heart” so that he could pour life into it. The question for us is “How will we fill this hunger?

You can catch the full sermon here.

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