Why did God create me to be a pedophile?

Question: Since the first time I experienced a sex drive it’s been directed towards little children. I’ve never acted on this, for I know it’s wrong. But it torments me. Why would God created me with pedophile cravings?

Answer: I’m so sorry for your condition and greatly respect the fact that you have committed yourself to never acting on your pedophiliac cravings.

I don’t doubt that you were born with these tendencies. You certainly didn’t choose them. Yet, I also don’t believe God created you this way.

We are born into a fallen, oppressed world. A great deal about our basic natures is corrupted from the start. Some are born with physical disorders, others with mental or psychological disorders, and all of us to some degree with spiritual disorders. These disorders then interact with our environment (social upbringing) which itself is fallen and oppressed. This isn’t by Gods’ design. It’s due to the fact that humanity is in a state of rebellion and is oppressed by Satan and the fallen Powers. The whole creation is polluted with this diabolic influence. Nothing works exactly the way it’s supposed to.

Fortunately, our genes and environment don’t determine us, though they do strongly influence us. With God’s grace, we are able to choose to pursue a thought life and behavioral life that honors God. This may require tremendous sacrifice. But everything about the Kingdom requires sacrifice, for the Kingdom always looks like Jesus, manifesting the beauty of God’s character by dying on a cross.

I encourage you to seek out counseling if you haven’t done so already. I hope you get completely healed, but I can’t promise that you will. This may simply be a cross you have to carry. But I can promise you that, if you surrender your cravings completely to Christ and pledge to living in his way with passion, his grace will be sufficient to see you through and he’ll make your sacrifice more than worth it.

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