Podcast: Why Did Jesus Say He Came to Bring a Sword?

Greg considers what Jesus meant when he said he had come to bring a sword.   

Sword

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Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
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Greg’s new book: Inspired Imperfection
Dan’s new book: Confident Humility


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