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What is the significance of Jonah 1:2; 3:2, 4–10; 4:2?

God “changed his mind” (3:10) about the destruction he planned to carry out on Nineveh.

If all events in history are eternally settled and known by God as such, his word to Jonah that he planned to destroy Nineveh in forty days was insincere as was his inspired testimony that he in fact changed his mind about his planned judgment. It is interesting to observe that while some today think that being willing to change one’s mind evidences a weakness and thus can’t be attributed to God, Jonah recognized that this willingness was one of God’s attributes of greatness (4:2).

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