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The Witness of Graffiti (Rocks Crying Out)

when your thoughts get painted on the wall

 Ibrahim Iujaz via Compfight

On this eve of Easter, we wanted to share something that fit the mood of the time between the crucifixion and the resurrection. D.L. Mayfield wrote this striking piece on the longing for the Kingdom of God in the midst of overwhelming brokenness. We thought it was the perfect reflection for this day suspended between grief and celebration.

From her reflection:

I think Jesus meant it all: that his coming, his way, his kingdom was marked both by celebration and anguish. He knew, more intimately and more deeply than we could ever imagine, the joy of his father’s heart and the suffering of what happens when we purposefully thwart it. He knows about me, my neighbors, this city—how the redemption is so real and good and possible (the rocks cry out) and how the hearts of the broken are barely holding on, while we keep trying to build our own safe fortresses high above the muck (the rocks cry out). He knows it all; and perhaps this is what he was thinking as he looked over Jeruslalem and wept.

In my neighborhood you can’t walk a block without seeing paint splashed on the walls. Some are joyful, hopeful and prophetic. Others are chilling, territorial, anguished. The rocks are crying out, just as Jesus said they would.

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