Forgiving the Unforgivable

malik richmondOsheta Moore wrote a courageous and challenging post last week entitled Washing the Feet of the Steubenville Rapists. It’s not an easy read, and if you’re vulnerable to triggers in this area, you might want to exercise caution. But Osheta offers a glimpse of redemption in the darkest of places. Can we move towards forgiveness and grace in these places of horror?

From her blog post:

As much as it’s against my nature as a mama, a woman, and an abuse survivor, I believe the Kingdom response to these boys whose choices have made them my enemy is to love them and to be willing to take my lead from Jesus; our  Someone, who washed the feet of his betrayer and prayed for forgiveness for his tortures while nailed to a cross.

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