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God’s Aikido Way of Defeating Evil

God’s Aikido Way of Defeating Evil

Greg continues his thoughts on the atonement with this installment highlighting the way God uses the evil intentions and actions of his enemies to bring about good. And because this strategy is based in love, the demons who encountered Christ could not possibly imagine what he was up to. They ended up participating in their own demise and our redemption.

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