We run our website the way we wished the whole internet worked: we provide high quality original content with no ads. We are funded by your direct support for ReKnew and our vision. Please consider supporting this project.

From Boston, With Love

Oz_Cross_Bombings_0

Image courtesy of Theological Graffiti

We posted some of T. C. Moore’s reflections on the Open 2013 conference earlier this week. T. C. lives in Boston and was deeply moved by the violence and terror that came to his city. Now we want to share his most recent blog post Oz and the Cross: Reflections on God’s Love and the Boston Marathon Bombings. In our rage and grief it’s all too easy to frame this tragedy as the “evil other” attacking the “righteous us.” But this is not the way of Jesus. We challenge you to sit with T. C.’s piece and view the recent bombings and the victims and perpetrators through a lens that moves us to prayer and peacemaking rather than revenge and self-righteousness. Can we view these events and confess, “God, have mercy on me, a sinner.”?

From T. C.’s blog:

Contrasting ourselves with an evil other does not produce the wholeness of God’s loving reign (shalom). Setting ourselves up against those who are trapped in sin, have succumb to a spirit of violence and death, does not magically make us the peculiar people who reflect God’s love. Instead, the only way for us to become the embodiment of God’s loving reign, is to model our love after the love of God demonstrated on Jesus’s cross: a love that prays for its murderer’s forgiveness. In Jesus’s death and life, he modeled a love that identified with those who were wounded, as well as those who were stigmatized—even with violent Zealots. The Apostle Paul, himself a violent murderer, was transformed by God’s love and called to herald the glorious Gospel of God’s Kingdom among the Gentiles. That’s the power of God’s love that is at work in this Jesus movement we call the Church!

Related Reading

Love in Unexpected Places

Here’s a letter we received from a reader pointing us to this TED talk: Hi,   My Name is Austin. I’ve been a podrishoner at Woodland Hills Church for the past 3 years and frequently visit reknew2015.wpengine.com.    I stumbled upon this TED talk from September 2012 yesterday entitled Israel & Iran: A Love Story.     Recently, Greg…

Did God Assist the Israelites in the Violent Battle with the Amalekites? (podcast)

Greg keeps his hands in the air as he battles against Old Testament interpretations that portray God as violent.  http://traffic.libsyn.com/askgregboyd/Episode_0748.mp3

How Revelation Uses Violent Images in an Anti-Violent Way

All the violent scenes in Revelation are symbols for the battle of truth and deception.  They never involve literal violence. In fact, they symbolize ANTI-VIOLENCE. The ingenious way John helps us get free of deception of trust in violent power is by taking a standard violent symbol and juxtaposing it with a symbol that undermines…

The Distinctive Mark of Jesus Followers

Jesus’ teaching to love our enemies was understandably shocking to his original audience—just as it is to us today. Jesus expected much, which is why, after telling his audience to love their enemies he added that if we only love those who love us and do good those who do good to us, we’re doing…

Sermon: Keeping the Valve Open

In this short sermon clip, Greg Boyd talks about Paul’s writings on getting our reality to line up with what God says is real. The full sermon discusses how God’s design for creation is beautiful. But, sometimes, we don’t follow God’s design for our life. In this sermon, Greg and Vanessa Williams address the battlefield…

Do All Roads Lead to God?

First, if it’s really true that Jesus is the way to Father and that no one comes to the Father except through him, (Jn 14:6) then it seems that no other religious leader or religious doctrine can bring us to the Father. “The” is a definite article, and it implies singularity. “A dog” could refer…