Making Resolutions? Consider This!

Rob-holding-manifesto-poster-square

So, this is the time of year when we all look back at the year that is passing and look ahead to the new year in front of us. If you’re considering a New Year’s resolution, we wanted to make a tiny suggestion for your consideration.

Greg has been fleshing out the ReKnew Manifesto in his recent series, and it occurred to us that although the manifesto is made up of ideas and things that we hold to be true and important, they are completely worthless unless they are lived out. Just as Jesus is described as the Word made flesh (John 1:14), we are all invited to give flesh to the reality of God and his Kingdom. We are calling for a peace-filled revolution that will draw people to Jesus.

So here’s the suggestion we hope you’ll consider:

Read through the manifesto, and notice what stands out to you. Is there something that calls to your heart and stirs up passion in you? As you notice this, consider what it would look like to begin to give this idea some flesh. What does this idea ask of you? Invite the Holy Spirit to inspire you and give you wisdom. Then make a short resolution based on your time in prayer and reflection. Tell others about it. Get support. Keep moving forward even when you forget about it and seem to be failing. Take little baby steps. Use your imagination to see and hear and feel yourself living out what the Holy Spirit has inspired in you.

If you decide to participate in this exercise we’d love to hear from you. You can contact us at editor@reknew2015.wpengine.com. Who knows what might come from even just a few of us agreeing together to make this revolution more than just a bunch of words.

Lord bless you, and let’s together commit to making 2014 a year in which we partner with God to bring about his will “on earth as it is in heaven.”

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