Toasted Ham and Nye

nye_ham_wide-95bd3d0d1113f407915a4633e23675ddf188daf5-s40-c85So, the big debate between Ken Ham and Bill Nye is history. We didn’t really pay a whole lot of attention to it, and here’s why.  In order for there to be a winner in this debate (because of the way it was framed) you had to choose between the false dichotomy of a believing the Bible or taking science seriously.

You don’t have to make that choice.

Related Reading

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