Podcast: What is the Greatest Philosophical Blunder in History?

Greg goes WAY back to trace an erroneous thought. His investigation brings all the way back to the pre-Socratics and the Ground-of-Being. 

blunder

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Dan: @thatdankent
Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
Twitter: @reKnewOrg


Greg’s new book: Inspired Imperfection
Dan’s new book: Confident Humility


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