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The Cruciform Way of the Lamb

In this video, Greg offers insight into how to read the Bible with the cross at the center of the revelation of God, thereby reframing how we interpret the violent and nationalistic passages of the Old Testament. Travis Reed from The Work of the People did a series of interviews with Greg a while ago and this video is one of the products of those interviews. If you like this, you can check out others at by clicking here. They have some great stuff and you can sign up for a free 30-day trial. Enjoy!

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