prayer

Praying for Peace During Political Hostility

Jesus calls his disciples to be “peacemakers” (Mt 5:9). During this season of political animosity, we have a great opportunity to practice being disciples by offering an alternative way of interacting with each other. One primary way we do this is by using the unique authority we have to affect the world through prayer to influence leaders in a peaceful direction. Prayer is also a main tool that kingdom people are to use to bring kingdom peace into conflicted situations in all our personal relationships as well as in our communities. Prayer confronts the violent demonic powers that fuel hostility in our world and it serves as a form of social activism.

Kingdom people are called to be peacemakers in every possible way. Where there is hostility between people with whom we have influence, we are to seek God’s wisdom about how he might use us to bring reconciliation. In our personal relationships and in our communities, we are not to get entrapped by the political hostility where one is belittling the other, but instead we are to be a people who always look for ways to offer peace.

For those of us who live in America, we are allowed some influence in our government by voting and participating in the political process in a variety of ways. If you choose to participate in this process, prayerfully reflect on how you can best influence leaders and support policies that will further the cause of peace. Of course, as I’ve stated many times in various posts and sermons, we must always remember that governments are premised on rebellion and remain under the strong influence of Satan. We must also always respect the inherent limitations and ambiguity of political “solutions” as well as their inherent coercive methodology. Therefore we must never confuse our particular way of influencing politics with our distinct kingdom call by labeling our political views “Christian.” But pray for peace and pray for political leaders and candidates during this time of hostility.

—Adapted from The Myth of a Christian Religion, page 195

Photo credit Ben White via Unsplash

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